John Boey - Central Real Estate
Central Real Estate | 617-828-3268 | [email protected]


Posted by John Boey on 10/14/2018

There’s many theories about when the best time of year to buy a home is. It’s spring, right? Not necessarily. Spring is one of the busiest times of the year for real estate but it’s not always the best time of year to buy a home. The emphasis on home buying in spring tends to be rooted in the fact that spring is associated with all things “new.” However, these misperceptions about the housing market can be detrimental to homebuyers. 


Spring And Summer Are Top Times To Sell


Many people get the urge to sell their properties in the spring and summer simply because they get new perspective after being cooped up in the house all winter long. People are ready for a change after the long winter. Moving close to the summertime works well with traditional school calendars. For some people, selling in the warmer months of the year is the best time, but it doesn’t hold true for everyone. 


Seasons Change


Others suggest that the best time to sell a home is in fall or winter. People who are looking to buy in the end of the year are often buying for a purpose. Their need to move is much greater. It could be due to family issues, home repair needs or other crucial factors, but these buyers are motivated. On the flip side, there’s less homes to look at since inventory tends to be lower at this time of the year.


In the spring, while many people are looking, their need to buy is much less urgent, so the demand is less. There’s a potential for more competition in the spring if you are a serious buyer just because of the high volume of shoppers. 


Remember one key fact: spring starts in January when we talk about real estate! The number of listings will continue to ramp up until about mid-May. Buyers will be looking throughout the summer months. Then, the number of buyers starts to drop off in September. 


The Bottom Line


There is really no “right” time to buy or sell real estate. The right time has to do with what works best for you. If you’re starting your search, it’s best to begin in the spring, but you may very well land the best deal in the fall when there’s less competition. When you start a serious home search, you get a better idea of what you want. You also don’t want to let the perfect house pass you by because you were waiting for “just the right time.” 


Some Additional Tips:


  • Avoid Closing Around Christmastime 
  • Know Your Moving Timetable
  • Consider How Long It May Take You To Find A Home
  • Remember That Closings Take At Least 30 Days


Whenever you buy a home, choosing a knowledgeable real estate agent can help you to close a great deal on your home whether you’re buying or selling. By planning ahead, the process will go much smoother.  




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by John Boey on 4/8/2018

When pests come into your home, there’s no creepier feeling that you may have as a homeowner. You may turn to your house insurance for assistance if the problem gets really bad. Let’s say that termites have taken over your home and gotten into your walls or foundation. Maybe mice have gotten into the walls of your home, or a squirrel has caused some major issues in the attic. Whatever the problem is, you want to remedy it quickly. It might be an expensive fix no matter what, but it has to be remedied for you to continue to live comfortably in your home. 


The Truth About Homeowners Insurance


Unfortunately, homeowners insurance doesn't cover pest infestations. It doesn’t matter if the termites have literally eaten you out of house and home, the insurance companies consider pests to be an avoidable problem. Even though you may wonder how bugs can be considered “avoidable,” it’s simple. The insurance company believes that regular maintenance and checking of your property can help to prevent bug infestations. This is why it’s so important to take care of your property and not neglect it. 


Collateral Damage


There are a few exceptions to the rule. If your ceiling caves in and it was caused by some of the pest damage, your insurance may cover the cost of the repairs to the ceiling. They may not cover the materials that are needed to repair the ceiling itself. Insurance claims can be tricky, so you’ll need to ask a lot of questions if these problems do occur for you.


What Homeowners Insurance Covers


There’s nothing more frustrating than paying an insurance premium to find out that it doesn’t actually cover anything that you need at a certain point and time. As a general rule, homeowners insurance policies cover things that are considered accidental. This would include natural disasters like hurricanes, hailstorms, or high winds. If a tree falls on your home due to a windstorm, there was really no way of preventing that from happening. Your insurance would cover this. Damage that happens over an extended period, like that of a pest infestation or an aging home generally is not covered by house insurance. 


Separate Policies


Some insurance companies do offer separate policies to cover damage from certain types of pests like termites. There are several varieties of insects that cause damage to wood structures, so these policies may be more general stating that they provide “wood destroying insect” coverage. If you live in an area that’s prone to termites, there’s a few options available to you including something called “termite bonds.”


Your best course of action as a homeowner is prevention. Keep up with regular maintenance around your home and inspect your home regularly for any problems that you may find.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by John Boey on 9/24/2017

Adding a house to the real estate market should be simple. However, a home seller must consider various factors before listing a home, or risks missing out on opportunities to stir up interest from potential homebuyers.

Some of the top factors to consider before you list a residence include:

1. Your Home's Interior and Exterior

Ultimately, your home only gets one chance to make a positive first impression on homebuyers. If a home seller dedicates the necessary time and resources to update a house's interior and exterior, he or she may be able to increase the likelihood of a quick home sale.

To improve a house's interior, it is important to declutter as much as possible. Remove any non-essential items from a home; these items can be sold at a garage sale or online or put into a storage unit until a home sells.

Furthermore, to enhance a home's exterior, a home seller should mow the front lawn, trim the hedges and perform assorted home exterior maintenance projects. With a dazzling home exterior, a home seller can help his or her residence stand out from other available houses.

2. The Local Housing Market

How does your home stack up against the competition? Study the local housing market closely, and you should have no trouble establishing a competitive price for your home.

Examine the prices of available residences that are similar to your own. Also, take a look at the prices of recently sold houses in your city or town. With this housing market data in hand, you can understand whether you're preparing to operate in a buyer's or seller's market and price your residence appropriately.

3. Home Appraisal Results

When it comes to getting a home ready for the real estate market, it never hurts to conduct a home appraisal.

During a home appraisal, a property inspector will assess a house's condition. After the appraisal is finished, this inspector will provide a homeowner with a copy of a home appraisal report.

A home appraisal report offers valuable insights into a home's condition and enables a home seller to prioritize myriad home improvement projects. As such, the report may help a home seller find ways to enhance a residence before he or she adds it to the real estate market.

Lastly, if you're looking to list a house in the foreseeable future, working with a real estate agent is key.

A real estate agent is happy to help you prep your residence for the housing market. He or she will offer honest, unbiased home selling recommendations and ensure you can upgrade your house as needed. Plus, this housing market professional will set up home showings and open houses, negotiate with homebuyers on your behalf and do whatever it takes to help you sell your residence.

Get your house ready for the real estate market – consider the aforementioned factors, and you can transform an ordinary residence into an awe-inspiring home.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by John Boey on 9/17/2017

Despite your real estate agent’s best efforts, you can’t seem to get to the place where you’re ready to choose one house over another. At best, house hunting with your spouse is frustrating. And it’s not that you haven’t already looked at 20 houses; you have. The problem is that your spouse and your tastes in houses are far apart. If you don’t work together and close this preference gap, you could lose out on a rare deal on a new home.

Closing gaps that couples have in housing amenities and structural musts

As awful as it may feel, your situation is not unique. Couples arguing over which house to buy is so common that there are television shows dedicated to the conflicts. Part of the reason why couples may struggle to reach consensus about buying a new house has to do with attachments that one or both people have to their current home.

Let someone be attached to their current house and you can expect that person to find at least one major, seemingly insurmountable, issue with any new house. Psychologists say that moving is emotionally tough on children and adults. Although there are people who move compulsively, packing and moving into a new home once every other year, many people prefer to stay where they are.

If you and your spouse keep bumping heads about which new house to purchase, sit down and talk about special experiences that you have that are tied to your current home. For example, you might have owed the house before you got married and have fond memories of summer backyard cookouts that you had with friends. If you move, you may think that you’ll be losing these special times similar to how people fear that getting laid off from a job will permanently take them away from friends they made at work.

Ways to work through the stress of a house move

Take a few days to talk about experiences you had at your current home. Assure one another that you can continue creating and enjoying great experiences alone and with family and friends at a new house, a place that fits your changing needs better.

Also, take pictures of your current home. Videotaping birthday parties, holiday events and sports and weekend hangouts are great ways to seize moments that you want to not only remember, but take to your new home. Start to take pictures and begin to create videotapes now, if you haven’t already incorporated this memory capturing process into your lifestyle.

Doing so sends a message to your spouse that you share his or her values. It also shows that you do appreciate your current home and agree that it was a smart decision to live in the house for as long as you did.

Look to the future

After you talk about what you appreciate about your current house and start capturing memorable experiences, see if your spouse isn’t more open to looking at new houses without searching for major flaws in the new house. If your spouse is still resistant to moving, create a list of things that your current house is preventing you from doing.

For example, your current house might be keeping you from expanding your family due to lack of space. Due to its design, your current home might be keeping you from building a home office. An aging parent might not be able to move in with you because of the way your current house is structured. Lack of yard space could prevent you from starting your event planning business or from hosting family gatherings.

Take a technical and an emotional approach when choosing a new house. It could help both your spouse and you adjust to the change. It could also help you both capture moments spent at your current house that you want to take to your new home with you.




Tags: houses   homes  
Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by John Boey on 9/10/2017

Remember how excited, happy and nervous you felt days before you moved into your current home? It was the perfect house, meeting you and your family’s needs. Hard to believe several years have passed since then. It may also be hard to believe that you’re actually considering moving into another house. But, moving just might be the right option. Makeup of a new city - Face it. You felt more curious, connected and happy when you visited a relative or friend at their home in another city. Culture, vibe, entertainment options and natural landscapes in the new area appeal to you. Moving to a new city might be just what you need to feel revitalized. Before you move to a new city, stay in the city for at least a week, this time without visiting family. It's a good way to learn more about the city and find out if you really want to move. Neighborhood changes – If crime in your neighborhood has increased, adding another lock on your house doors and windows may not be the best option. Instead, it may be time to move to a better, less crime ridden, city. Argumentative neighbors, an increase in untrained neighborhood pets and congested traffic are other reasons why moving may be a good option. Family Size – Adult children leaving home to embark on their own could cause your house to feel too big. After your adult children leave, you may also desire to relocate and move closer to your siblings or parents. Similar to empty nesting, plans to have children could inspire a move. Infants and toddlers becoming teenagers may require added privacy or the need for growing children to have their own bedroom instead of sharing a room with one to two siblings. Marital status – Get married, separated or divorced and you may not have much of a choice as to whether or not you’ll move to a new home. The move could help you to accept other transitions that your marital status change brings into your life. Moving into a new house may also help you to feel empowered, certain that you can thrive on your own or with your new spouse. Career – Opportunity to work a better job in another city or neighborhood may inspire a move. These career opportunities could come through a company led relocation, market shifts or a job search. Moving to a new area could also introduce you to employers, new clients you could support as an independent contractor, franchise or government agency work opportunities that you were previously unaware of. Your current house itself may also be a reason to move. The number of home repairs required to keep your house in good condition may have increased, possibly even doubling, since you bought the house. Construction or local zoning laws may have had a negative impact on sewage and water sources where you live. These are times when moving may be a good option.




Categories: Uncategorized  




Tags